Blog Smith

Blog Smith is inspired by the myth of Hephaestus in the creation of blacksmith-like, forged materials: ideas. This blog analyzes topics that interest me: IT, politics, technology, history, education, music, and the history of religions.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Who Is the Most Articulate President?

Articulate

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Raven Star on Baltimore

Raven

UCLA Computer History: Kleinrock Center for Internet Studies

Theatrical release, 6 August 1948
 
Some years before the first transmission was made, in part, in Boelter Hall, another machine made UCLA a center for technological advancement. In the late 1940s UCLA’s College of Engineering received a differential analyzer, also known as a mechanical computer, from General Electric. This analog machine cost $125,000 to make and performed mechanical calculations at an unprecedentedly fast rate. Housed at UCLA, near the center of the film making industry, the mechanical computer even became a movie star when it was displayed in the 1951 science-fiction movie When Worlds Collide.

Unfortunately, UCLA’s mechanical computers eventually became outdated in the 1960s, though it clearly served as a forerunner to what Kleinrock and the others would do later on in that decade. One of the machines was sent to the Smithsonian Institute in 1978, but it will be remembered for mid century technology advancement in Southern California.









Kleinrock

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Judging Blacks

Judging

Unit 3

https://d2f1egay8yehza.cloudfront.net/MIT11127/MIT11127T115-V007300_DTH.mp4

Welcome to Unit 3!
It's hard to make a good game; great ideas are only a start. In this unit, we'll talk to several experts about their process for designing learning games, with a special focus on prototyping. 
  • Important Design Questions: Prof. Colleen Macklin and Prof. Scott Nicholson tell us about their experiences designing and prototyping games and share the kinds of questions they ask during the process. 
  • Lure of the Labyrinth: Design Process: Prof. Eric Klopfer and Scot Osterweil take us through the creation of math-based puzzle game Lure of the Labyrinth
  • Lure of the Labyrinth: Prototyping & Testing: Scot Osterweil and Dan Roy play Lure of the Labyrinth and explain how they iteratively prototyped and play-tested.
  • Reach for the Sun: Objectives & Tradefoffs: Prof. Eric Klopfer and Dan Norton play Reach for the Sun and consider aspects of its development. 
We will be reading excerpts of Moving Learning Games Forward by Eric Klopfer, et al. and those who wish to dive deeper can read "Introduction: The Logic of Backwards Design" by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins. 
Appearances by: Colleen Macklin, Scott Nicholson, Scot Osterweil, Dan Roy, Dan Norton
http://youtu.be/71L-wUBhiWA
Prof. Colleen Macklin, from Parsons The New School for Design, tells us what kinds of questions she asks when designing and prototyping games. As you work on your project, consider asking yourself some of the same questions, including: "What is the most interesting thing my game could convey to players?" and "What is this game going to feel like?."
http://youtu.be/sg0_GX5D_Rw
Prof. Scott Nicholson from Syracuse University discusses his gaming experiences and his thought processes for conceiving and designing games. Note that he tries to a create a simple prototype early in the process so that he can get his game into the hands of players. Remember that you can still get value from making and testing a simple paper prototype, even early in the design process.
http://youtu.be/NLen6hS1lS8
Scot Osterweil and Prof. Eric Klopfer begin their conversation about the creation of Lure of the Labyrinth. First, they talk about the design and prototyping process in general. As you watch the videos in this section, think about your own game and how you might learn from their process and from their ideas. How do the lessons of Labyrinth apply to your game?
http://youtu.be/oktupItPujc
Scot and Eric speak about the project approval process, determining and balancing needs, considering resources, and securing partners.
http://youtu.be/IGeVYhdYLtU
For this activity break, we're going to think about creating a paper prototype for a particular game mechanism, rather than an entire game. First choose a digital game, then choose one mechanism of that game (how players will take turns, how new information is presented, etc.) and think about how you would create a playable paper prototype. Here's an example: I'm interested in testing how game pieces will be introduced for my Tetris-like puzzle game. I could create the paper pieces in the variety of shapes I'm using and then hand one to a player on a schedule, say every 10 seconds. Perhaps you might learn that, like Tetris, you might want to start progressively decreasing that time period. You can either look at an existing digital game or your own project; consider how you would create a paper prototype for one mechanism. You are welcome to share your reflections (and photos if relevant) with your classmates in the forum.
https://voice.adobe.com/a/2qgAX
Scot Osterweil and game designer Dan Roy, who worked on Lure of the Labyrinth, play the Cafeteria Puzzle (in Lure of the Labyrinth) and discuss how paper prototyping helped them figure out aspects of the gameplay.
http://youtu.be/Whnk3ttAy84
Scot and Dan talk about importance of playtesting and the iterative approach they used to test an aspect of the game.
http://youtu.be/Whnk3ttAy84
To test certain puzzles in Lure of the Labyrinth, it was more effective to use a crude digital prototype. Dan explains and also underscores the importance of allowing players to really play your game, rather than just asking them to comment on a demonstration. As you work the project, make sure you play your own game and allow others to play it.
http://youtu.be/6zTaLt1pDrM
Prof. Eric Klopfer talks to Dan Norton at Filament Games about Reach for the Sun, a plant growth learning game. Dan plays and gives the rationale for various design decisions.
http://youtu.be/6zTaLt1pDrM
http://youtu.be/HcrlEVTRJbI

Unit 3 Reading MOVING LEARNING GAMES FORWARD Read the sections "Learning Game Design Principles" and "Examples" (pgs. 28-40). Klopfer, E. et al. 2009. Moving Learning Games Forward: Obstacles, Opportunities, & Openness. Cambridge MA: MIT The Education Arcade. DIVE DEEPER Read "Introduction: The Logic of Backwards Design" for an overview of a widely-used method for curriculum development. Scot references backwards design in u3.v3.s3. McTighe, Jay, and Grant P. Wiggins. 2004. Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

http://youtu.be/yOpA9OA-LfY

OK! You’ve laid a foundation for the last few weeks - now it’s time to start making your game. For the next 4 weeks (Unit 3 and Unit 4), you have lots of room to make passes at creating your own learning games! Take a look at the feedback you’ve received, find teammates if you are interested, and start designing and building prototypes of your game. Create paper versions or digital versions, and try to collect feedback on the forums, as well as from your friends and family in real life. Deliverable: A publicly viewable and if possible playable version of your prototype(s) with documentation about the following: target audience learning objectives the "fun" in your topic your reasons for choosing certain game mechanics your experiences developing, testing & revising your prototype When you're designing, don't lose sight of the goal of your game and what you want the learner to get out of it. When you're prototyping, think about the following: What is most important for you to know? With each prototype, you should be trying to figure out a few specific things - is it more fun with more players? Does adding “points” make it more fun? Are these mechanics balanced well? If you change too many things between prototypes, it can be difficult to tell which of your changes are working and which aren’t. How can your classmates play this game? It’s easy if you are working in GameBlox to share your games in the forums, and other digital protoypes may be shareable through sites like Dropbox etc. If want feedback on a paper prototype, consider making a .pdf file that they can print and also make a video so they can understand your prototype as well as possible. Are people learning? We’ll be addressing this question more formally in Units 4 and 5, but for now - what do you think? Are people using the game’s language to describe their moves and decisions? Are players getting a better understanding of your topic as they get better at the game? Ask people what is confusing to them, and see how you can improve it. Remember to take a look at everyone else’s games! Think of this as a really big studio class. A large part of your learning is going to take place not just by watching videos or reading articles, but in your interactions in the forums. Debate, ask questions, and provide constructive feedback! Finally, don’t forget to have fun! There’s a lot to think about in this course, but you’re making games, so enjoy it! Guidance for Peer Feedback Provide feedback to at least three participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following: Give your overall impressions of the game. Were there aspects of the game that you think worked especially well? How can you help the participant improve his or game? You might suggest a change/addition or ask a question. Does the game seem aligned to the learning objectives? Are there ways the participant might improve alignment? How did the participant's prototype influence your own thinking?




















Cambridge Hawk Takes Down Drone

Hawk

Assignment 3.1

OK! You’ve laid a foundation for the last few weeks - now it’s time to start making your game. For the next 4 weeks (Unit 3 and Unit 4), you have lots of room to make passes at creating your own learning games! Take a look at the feedback you’ve received, find teammates if you are interested, and start designing and building prototypes of your game. Create paper versions or digital versions, and try to collect feedback on the forums, as well as from your friends and family in real life.
Deliverable: A publicly viewable and if possible playable version of your prototype(s) with documentation about the following:
  • target audience 
The target audience is working adults with the average age about 35 years old. They are students who typically have gone to work all day and have family and personal responsibilities and then attend class between 6 and 10 PM at night. 
  • learning objectives
The learning objectives include the idea of learning humanities and culture but in a more interesting and informed manner. By playing a game they are no doubt putting in more time but are much more active in the learning objective is for them to be engaged in their own learning.
  • the "fun" in your topic
  • The fun in the topic is that students will be engaged, will interact more with their peers, and will follow avenues of culture that are unique to the gameplay of the individual student.
  • your reasons for choosing certain game mechanics
  • I am choosing the mechanics of the game to include the five countries represented that closely parallel the actual Renaissance cultural conditions. they start off as more or less equal but as in the Renaissance the countries need to develop their cultural production and diplomatic achievements.
  • your experiences developing, testing & revising your prototype
Several points can be made in developing, testing, and revising this prototype. Based on feedback that I received the game needs to be set towards diplomatic and cultural interactions and as a humanities class an emphasis must be placed on those aspects in particular.
When you're designing, don't lose sight of the goal of your game and what you want the learner to get out of it.  When you're prototyping, think about the following: 
I want the students to get out of it more than what they expect. It is not only cultural appreciation but the goal is to understanding how resources must be artfully balanced and allocated towards the winning goal cultures have decided upon.
  • What is most important for you to know? With each prototype, you should be trying to figure out a few specific things - is it more fun with more players? Does adding “points” make it more fun? Are these mechanics balanced well? If you change too many things between prototypes, it can be difficult to tell which of your changes are working and which aren’t.
  • It is most important for me to understand how someone can pick up the game fairly easy to begin but then to actually learn from it as well. I have found through testing that about five is a good number; however, I would like at some point to try the online and connected version of the game. Adding elements does not really contribute given the fact that during the game successes or failures are continuously looped back for the learner to grasp. Yes, the mechanics are soundly conceived.

  • How can your classmates play this game? It’s easy if you are working in GameBlox to share your games in the forums, and other digital protoypes may be shareable through sites like Dropbox etc. If want feedback on a paper prototype, consider making a .pdf file that they can print and also make a video so they can understand your prototype as well as possible.
  • Classmates can play at least some version of the franchise Civilization in fact one responder went to FreeCiv to at least be introduced to the concept of the game. It is an early free and online version of the game.

  • Are people learning? We’ll be addressing this question more formally in Units 4 and 5, but for now - what do you think? Are people using the game’s language to describe their moves and decisions? Are players getting a better understanding of your topic as they get better at the game? Ask people what is confusing to them, and see how you can improve it.

Students are learning and having fun with it. In a testing environment several students had just taken a previous course--HUM111--but found my prototype for HUM112 much more engaging and interesting. Yes, they are using the game's language because you find the units produced are referred to and shorthand versions of gameplay introduced into their interaction. The players are better understanding how cultural production develops as they advance in the game which is one of the important learning objectives. The confusions can be cleared up as they game facility in gameplay.

Remember to take a look at everyone else’s games! Think of this as a really big studio class. A large part of your learning is going to take place not just by watching videos or reading articles, but in your interactions in the forums. Debate, ask questions, and provide constructive feedback!
Finally, don’t forget to have fun! There’s a lot to think about in this course, but you’re making games, so enjoy it!
Guidance for Peer Feedback
Provide feedback to at least three participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following:
  • Give your overall impressions of the game. Were there aspects of the game that you think worked especially well? How can you help the participant improve his or game? You might suggest a change/addition or ask a question.
  • Does the game seem aligned to the learning objectives? Are there ways the participant might improve alignment?
  • How did the participant's prototype influence your own thinking?

Islamist Nazi Strategy to Shut Down Debate

Strategies

Islamic Iran Seizes 34 American Sailors

Ranson

Defending Marriage by Judicial Watch

Defending Marriage
In a little less than two weeks, on April 28, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument on the extraordinary notion that the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution requires a state to license or recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex.  Your Judicial Watch is participating in this historic legal battle.  The bold intervention of federal judges in remaking marriage is a challenge to self-government.  That the U.S. Constitution would suddenly require states to change their marriage laws to keep up with the changing tastes of liberal elites is the antithesis of federalism and undermines the rule of law.  (You can track the legal arguments and numerous briefs filed here.)
Earlier this month, we filed an amicus curiae brief in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting the rights of the states of Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and Michigan (James Obergefell, et al. v. Richard Hodges, et al.(No. 14-556, -562, -571, -574)).  Our brief makes the case for judicial restraint with respect to marriage.  In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit reversed district court rulings that would have imposed same-sex marriage on those four states. This ruling, which is quite sensible, is at odds with judicial activist rulings from other circuit courts that redefined marriage in Virginia, Indiana, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Utah, Idaho and Nevada.  So now the Supreme Court may resolve the conflicts and rule, astonishingly, whether the American people can maintain the definition of marriage that goes back thousands of years. 
In our brief, our legal team argues "the role of defining marriage and implementing laws in regard to it has always been primarily the province of the States," and that the courts have continually reaffirmed that tradition. Reversing that trend would only create legal and political confusion:
Interference with the States' sovereign sphere and ultimately, with the right of their citizens to engage in the democratic process, is contrary to our system of government and will result in dangerous constitutional conflicts.
JW also argues that denying recognition of out-of state marriages that conflict with state law is not a constitutional violation.  Specifically, the courts have traditionally recognized marriage as an issue residing within the states' sovereign sphere of authority:
While it is in within the federal government's power to intervene in the sphere of marital relations, this Court has made it very clear that those interventions are to be infrequent, deferential to State authority, and always with the balance of federalism in mind.
We also remind the Supreme Court that history matters, and that a practice going back to the beginnings of our nation deserves respect under the First Amendment:
Marriage has, by definition, been the province of the States and has been traditionally defined as one man and one woman. This has been the case since the nation's founding. There is no evidence that defining marriage in that way was viewed as discriminatory or in violation of any constitutional rights or principles. Segments of society have begun to take a different perspective but this is hardly a sufficient reason to cast aside this "unique history" consistent with "centuries of national practice." 463 U.S. at 790. "[I]t is not necessary to define the precise boundary of the Establishment Clause where history shows that the specific practice is permitted. Any test the Court adopts must acknowledge a practice that was accepted by the Framers and has withstood the critical scrutiny of time and political change." Town of Greece at 1819. "From the founding of the Republic to 2003, every State defined marriage as a relationship between a man and a woman, meaning the Fourteenth Amendment permits, though it does not require, States to define in that way." DeBoer, 772 F.3d 388, 404; see also Town of Greece, 134 S. Ct. at 1818-1820.
Finally, we warn that requiring the recognition of out-of-state marriages conflicting with state law will inevitably lead to constitutional conflicts and lead to harmful consequences:
[F]orcing States to recognize out-of-state same sex marriages that conflict with state law would ostensibly open the door to forcing States to recognize all out-of-state marriages that conflict with state law regardless of the conflict. This would completely remove the States from the marital relations sphere or at the very least, make state laws worthless.
The bottom line is we need to get away from results-oriented jurisprudence that substitutes judicial activism and a political agenda for constitutional safeguards and responsible adjudication.
The Supreme Court should resist the temptation to impose its moral values on marriage through raw judicial power, as it did with abortion through Roe v. Wade.
The judicial branch is being asked to undertake a power grab unmoored from the Constitution, history, self-government, and judicial restraint. 
Simply put, under our republican form of government, the Supreme Court has no power to invalidate laws protecting traditional marriage under the United States Constitution. 

Monday, April 27, 2015

Resist the Police State

Resist

Sunday, April 26, 2015

America's Comeback on Energy

America

Islamist Song, Remington

American

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Rips Homeless Man's Sign

Man Rips Up Homeless Man's Sign

BLM Thugs vs. Oathkeepers

BLM Thugs

Massive Nepal Earthquake

Earthquake

British Admiral: Islamist Island Raids

“The Western world needs to have more self belief in its own values, it has to hold its nerve, and we have to rediscover a lot of self-reliance”.

Islamist

Friday, April 24, 2015

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Ian Hunter Alice Live 2011 Carnigie PA

Alice

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lDPRKwBv5h0

Who Is Joe Biden?

Uncle Joe

Killer Obama Admits Droning Another American

Killer Obama

CAIR and Hamas

Killers

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Assignment 2.1

- Who is your audience?
My audience consists of working adults approximately 35 years old. Since they are working adults they have generally worked all day and are taking evening classes between 6 and 10 PM. My learners are particularly challenged to be active and involved after a long day.

- What is your topic? Why is that interesting?
My topic is the Renaissance. It is an interesting area since it is the rebirth of western Civilization.

- Briefly explain your game. What is the fun in your topic/game?  
My game is a modification of Civilization IV. Define in the topic word game is that it is a innovative way to introduce the course content. The learning is counterfactual or a counter history of what we know occurred. The student has history unfold before them. The fun is a more pleasurable way to learn in a required class.

- Where/how do you propose the game will be played?
It will be in a computer lab. But how will be following a lecture or presentation about the period.
The game will be paid played in segments between 6 and 10 PM. It is a classroom University setting. Following an introduction the students move into a computer lab.

- Think about the curriculum assignment from Unit 1 - how do you think someone would use your game to teach?

WHO are your students? Consider their age, grade level, etc. My students are working age adults the average age about 35 And this is college level. 
WHAT do you want them to learn? What are the content, skills, or ideas you want your students to come away with? ex: Underlying causes of the U.S. Civil War; Programming procedures; Pre-algebra understanding of variables I want them to learn history firsthand. The content is history but learning history skillfully through gameplay. The ideas I want them to come away with our depreciation of breaking difficult cultural decisions which may differ from the actual history, that is, counter history.
WHERE are students playing the game? What is the context? Are they playing the game and discussing it in more than one context? ex: At home; In a 6th grade Computer Science classroom; On the bus on their phone I would see them playing it for about one hour in a four hour class session. There is a possibility though which the game allows and that is to play online against other players.
WHY this game? What mechanics make it suited for this topic? ex: Role-playing as Abraham Lincoln, making decisions; Programming simple robots to complete game goals; Puzzles that require algebraic thinking to complete. The mechanics make it possible for students to make decisions about civilization and how history will unfold for them. They need to make decisions so that their civilization will survive and even flourish if possible.
HOW are you implementing the game? How are the learning goals of the game integrated into your activities and goals? ex: Before instruction, as a thought starter; As an in-class competition to stimulate peer learning; As extra credit or enrichment for a struggling student. The game is implemented as a part of the course in history. The game is integrated in that students are required to learn history but they should see it in a more personal way by building their own civilization. Peer learning is important because students need to learn the game and they can help one another and they need to compare their civilization with others.
As above, you need not create more than a page or a few minutes of video to make your point(s). Post your curriculum to a filesharing website (see our list if you don't already have a service you use), then post a link in your post in the forum. Check out how your peers responded. BE SURE TO MAKE THE DOCUMENT PUBLICLY VIEWABLE so that you classmates can see your work.
Guidance for Peer Feedback: Provide feedback to the two participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following: In your opinion, is this game suitable considering the subject matter and the identified students? Has the participant explained why this game will enable students to learn the desired subject/content? Do you think the game serves its purpose? Has the participant considered issues related to the implementation of the game? Examples: Would this game just be played once or would the students come back to it later? Would the students play the game with a limited population or everyone?

Obama Promotes Islam: Honors Muslim Saint

Promoting Islam

Unit 2

11.127x Unit 2 is now live! This week we’ll think about how games can mean something. How can a game convey a concept? How do players learn from games? You’ll hear about characteristics and qualities of games and recognize some of the ways games are special. For this unit, you will create a pitch for your learning game and of course, provide feedback on other pitches.

The pitch is a very important assignment. You will be sharing your thoughts regarding the learning game you’ll be developing over the rest of the course. Just like in Unit 1, you’ll post in the forum for the assignment. However, we’d also like you to consider engaging with your working group (survey-based) and/or affinity group for the purpose of providing and receiving additional feedback. Don’t worry if you haven’t been active with a group yet; now is a great time to get involved! Complete the working group survey or check out the affinity groups.

Thank you for participating in the live Reddit event. Eric appreciated your thoughtful questions. The archive of the event is still available, and if you search for "profklopfer" you can easily find his responses. Our next live event will happen on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 2:30 PM UTC. Course staff will critique selected prototypes.

Welcome to Unit 2!
A digital game is often much more than just a game. In Unit 2, we’re going to attempt to outline how and why.
  • Lenses: Dr. Ian Bogost introduces the concept of procedural rhetoric and Prof. Eric Zimmerman talks about games and instrumentality. These are both perspectives that will help you consider the meaning of games in new ways. 
  • Unexpected Lessons: Prof. Kurt Squire explains to Prof. Eric Klopfer how players can sometimes learn unexpected, unplanned things from games, even from games designed for entertainment. He considers how this impacts game design and implementation. 
  • Frameworks for Educational Games: Scot Osterweil and Eric present frameworks that they find to be valuable when thinking about educational games. 
  • Learning in a Gaming Environment: Prof. Constance Steinkuehler discusses how massively multiplayer online game (MMO) players learn in and around the gamespace. Joel Levin describes ways players learn in the game Minecraft and also how the game has inspired interesting projects in the educational sphere.  
We will be reading excerpts of Quest to Learn: Developing the School for Digital Kids by Katie Salen, et al. and those who wish to dive deeper can read Ian Bogost’s “The Rhetoric of Video Games."
Presentations : Dr. Ian Bogost (a 2011 ScriptaLab taped event originally presented February 17, 2011),  Prof. Eric Zimmerman (taped at the Sandbox Summit in 2012) - Note: This content was not produced by edX, The Education Arcade, or Scheller Teacher Education Program.
Appearances by: Kurt Squire, Scot Osterweil, Constance Steinkuehler, Joel Levin
http://youtu.be/4gQX6eEom6w
Welcome to Unit 2! A digital game is often much more than just a game. In Unit 2, we’re going to attempt to outline how and why. Lenses: Dr. Ian Bogost introduces the concept of procedural rhetoric and Prof. Eric Zimmerman talks about games and instrumentality. These are both perspectives that will help you consider the meaning of games in new ways. Unexpected Lessons: Prof. Kurt Squire explains to Prof. Eric Klopfer how players can sometimes learn unexpected, unplanned things from games, even from games designed for entertainment. He considers how this impacts game design and implementation. Frameworks for Educational Games: Scot Osterweil and Eric present frameworks that they find to be valuable when thinking about educational games. Learning in a Gaming Environment: Prof. Constance Steinkuehler discusses how massively multiplayer online game (MMO) players learn in and around the gamespace. Joel Levin describes ways players learn in the game Minecraft and also how the game has inspired interesting projects in the educational sphere. We will be reading excerpts of Quest to Learn: Developing the School for Digital Kids by Katie Salen, et al. and those who wish to dive deeper can read Ian Bogost’s “The Rhetoric of Video Games." Presentations : Dr. Ian Bogost (a 2011 ScriptaLab taped event originally presented February 17, 2011), Prof. Eric Zimmerman (taped at the Sandbox Summit in 2012) - Note: This content was not produced by edX, The Education Arcade, or Scheller Teacher Education Program. Appearances by: Kurt Squire, Scot Osterweil, Constance Steinkuehler, Joel Levin
http://youtu.be/Qe4poKsy9lw
In this video, Dr. Ian Bogost addresses one way we might look at how games mean. He addresses his idea of “procedural rhetoric,” whereby the rules of a system create a model of reality, and that model is a kind of argument about the world. As Dr. Bogost describes, the game Animal Crossing enabled a key insight about how that game’s mechanic of house decorating enables a window to examine capitalism. While it can, at times, be a demanding talk to understand if you are new to these ideas, we promise that we assigned it because a) Dr. Bogost is a highly entertaining public speaker and b) we believe that his analysis and ideas are an important way to understand how a game can mean something - through its rules. (If you find it challenging, we suggest reading the transcript and/or reading the associated "Dive Deeper" chapter in this unit.) Think about this argument as you watch the other videos in this Unit - how does this perspective differ from Eric Zimmerman’s or Scot Osterweil’s, say? What is similar? Dr. Ian Bogost is an award-winning videogame designer and media philosopher and director of the Georgia Institute of Technology digital media graduate program. This is a recording of one of the 2011 ScriptaLab events originally presented February 17, 2011.
http://youtu.be/mReVUr_bvI8
In this talk, The New Art of Gaming (Presented at Sandbox Summit, 2012), Prof. Eric Zimmerman talks about the concept of “instrumentality.” This is a long talk, but a compelling one as Prof. Zimmerman cautions against treating games as mere vehicles for learning, but instead treating them as cultural objects in their own right. He asserts that this can be even more educational (and a better education!) than treating games as a content delivery mechanism. What do you think? How might his ideas be considered in light of the ideas of others in this unit? Are they at odds? Are they complementary? Prof. Eric Zimmerman is a founder of the NYU Game Center and, "a game designer, entrepreneur, author, and academic who has been working in the game industry for 15 years." Sandbox Summit is an annual idea forum at MIT that addresses how technology affects the ways kids play, learn and connect. For more information, visit sandboxsummit.org.
http://youtu.be/iVfFkIYXRHA
Prof. Kurt Squire talks about learning from his own early gaming experiences and how this has influenced his understanding of how games can foster learning, as well as how games can be utilized in the classroom. As you think about your project, consider things learners might take away from your game that may not be related to the subject matter.
http://youtu.be/iVfFkIYXRHA
Now that you have had the opportunity to hear Kurt Squire talk about how games can spark unintended learning, take a moment to reflect on your own game-playing experiences. Have you played a game that taught you things you didn't expect? What did you learn? Why was it unexpected? You are welcome to share your reflections with your classmates in the forum.
Scot Osterweil and Eric Klopfer speak about the nature of play and discuss what makes a good game. Scot breaks down these factors into his Four Freedoms of Play and provides illustrative examples. Remember the concept of "hard fun" as you work on your course project.
http://youtu.be/tuFRWwI-yxg
Eric and Scot's conversation continues and Eric identifies characteristics and qualities that make games "gamey." What do you think about the principles Eric talks about? As you go through this unit, think about whether certain ones are more important to you than others.
http://youtu.be/bemLRevyBKI
Play a game for about 15 minutes; it doesn't necessarily have to be digital. As you play, think about it in terms of the Four Freedoms of Play and the Five Principles for Games that Scot and Eric discussed. Did you have the freedom to explore? Did the game offer you interesting choices? These questions are just an example of the kinds of the things you might think about. Feel free to write your thoughts in the forum and discuss other participants' experiences.
Prof. Constance Steinkuehler describes a few ways learning occurs in and around massively multiplayer online games (MMOs) like World of Warcraft. She explains that spaces around MMOs, like forums, are fertile ground for discussion and analysis regarding social interaction and learning. It is important to consider the context in which games exist and the context they can generate for learning; don't forget about context as you work on your project.
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/courseware/ac7f69bfecde48198dfaa58ae1cb40b6/74a8e323054c4877b4f196e43145ab42/
Constance and Eric continue their discussion. Eric talks about some of his own experiences playing World of Warcraft and getting help in and around the game.
http://youtu.be/ujJ3gRPZcuI
Joel Levin discusses how learning in Minecraft has inspired implementation in the classroom.
http://youtu.be/DaFvvxEDkL4
http://youtu.be/Fb9M0bFpD4s
QUEST TO LEARN This book is a research and development document outlining the learning framework for the school Quest to Learn in New York. Read the "Game Based-Learning and Knowing Section," and browse through the "Curriculum and Instruction" section if you are interested. Salen, Katie, et al. 2011. Quest to Learn: Developing the School for Digital Kids. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. DIVE DEEPER: THE RHETORIC OF VIDEO GAMES Peruse this article to enhance your understanding of the video presentation. Bogost, Ian. "The Rhetoric of Video Games." The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. Edited by Katie Salen. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 117–140. doi: 10.1162/dmal.9780262693646.117
http://q2l.org
http://dmlcentral.net/sites/dmlcentral/files/resource_files/Quest_to_LearnMacfoundReport.pdf
http://www.cogsci.rpi.edu/public_html/ruiz/EGDFall2013/readings/RhetoricVideoGames_Bogost.pdf
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/courseware/ac7f69bfecde48198dfaa58ae1cb40b6/25bedf9b46aa4dbfa9eaf5a0a27d4f4e/
For this week, we’re asking you to develop a pitch for a learning game you want to make over the duration of the rest of the course. Prof. Klopfer has addressed this in the introductory video, and Jason explains more above. Present the other members of the class with a brief explanation of a game you’d like to make (in the forums). You can do this in any form - text, video, slide presentation - just remember to make your links public before you share. Below are some important things to consider when making your pitch: Go With What You Know: For creating your first learning game, it’s probably a good idea to teach something you have some familiarity with. This will make it easier to generate content and come up with good ideas. Of course - this can backfire. If you’re too expert in your topic, it may be difficult to understand what might be challenging for novices to understand. Scope It Down: As Jason mentions in the video, don’t try to make a simulation of every aspect of a trip to Mars. Make as simple and small a game as you can to start. Make a simulator that will help understand climate on Mars instead. Focus Up: Make sure you get the most important details into your pitch: - Who is your audience? - What is your topic? Why is that interesting? - Briefly explain your game. What is the fun in your topic/game? - Where/how do you propose the game will be played? - Think about the curriculum assignment from Unit 1 - how do you think someone would use your game to teach? Remember, we encourage collaboration in this class, so be on the look out for people with similar interests - you might be able to team up and make an even more impressive project than you could make on your own. Guidance for Peer Feedback Provide feedback to at least three participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following: Do you think the game serves its purpose, meaning it is appropriate to the topic, audience, and how it will be used to teach? How can you help the participant improve his or game? You might suggest a change/addition (Ex.: Consider covering pre-alegra skills.) or a question (Ex.: Do you think this game could be used to assess learners' progress later in the year?). Did a participant's pitch prompt a change in your own thinking? If so, comment on it.

The goal of this assignment is for you to become more comfortable with Gameblox. We recommend that you pick a project and modify it in some way. You can pick a project from the demos page or any other Gameblox project you have seen. demo link Alternatively, if you have a simple game in mind, think of one small aspect of that game, and go ahead and build it in Gameblox. Don't make it fancy and don't make it elaborate. Just get it working and running so that you, the game designer, understand how that mechanic works and how your player will interact with it. If you are choosing to work in a different digital tool, do the same thing: get a very basic mechanic up and working. Post your game in the forums, and describe what changes you have made, and what challenges you ran into.


The goal of this assignment is for you to become more comfortable with Gameblox. We recommend that you pick a project and modify it in some way. You can pick a project from the demos page or any other Gameblox project you have seen. demo link Alternatively, if you have a simple game in mind, think of one small aspect of that game, and go ahead and build it in Gameblox. Don't make it fancy and don't make it elaborate. Just get it working and running so that you, the game designer, understand how that mechanic works and how your player will interact with it. If you are choosing to work in a different digital tool, do the same thing: get a very basic mechanic up and working. Post your game in the forums, and describe what changes you have made, and what challenges you ran into.
























Hillary's Lesbian Lovers Named

Lesbian

Pamela Geller on Philadelphia TV

Philadelphia TV

Islamic Persecution of Christians

Persecution

Harvard Students Answer: what is a bigger threat to world peace?

Anerica's Future Leaders

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Rate My Prof

Rate

Detention for Honoring Flag

Flag

Friday, April 17, 2015

How Americans Define Success

Success

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Steve Harvey

College

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Libertarian Rating of Governors

Rate

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Assignment 1.2 Draft Curriculum

ASSIGNMENT 1.2: DRAFT CURRICULUM Suggested Due Date: 4/14/2015, 11:59 PM UTC For the second assignment in this unit, we’re asking you to draft a curriculum design - tell us how you would teach something with a game that already exists. Many of you may not have experience with designing curricula, but again this is a just a brief exercise to get you started thinking about how to teach with games. Here are some basic questions to consider (my game is Civilization IV):

WHO are your students? Consider their age, grade level, etc. My students are working age adults the average age about 35 And this is college level.

WHAT do you want them to learn? What are the content, skills, or ideas you want your students to come away with? ex: Underlying causes of the U.S. Civil War; Programming procedures; Pre-algebra understanding of variables I want them to learn history firsthand. The content is history but learning history skillfully through gameplay. The ideas I want them to come away with our depreciation of breaking difficult cultural decisions which may differ from the actual history, that is, counter history.

WHERE are students playing the game? What is the context? Are they playing the game and discussing it in more than one context? ex: At home; In a 6th grade Computer Science classroom; On the bus on their phone I would see them playing it for about one hour in a four hour class session. There is a possibility though which the game allows and that is to play online against other players.

WHY this game? What mechanics make it suited for this topic? ex: Role-playing as Abraham Lincoln, making decisions; Programming simple robots to complete game goals; Puzzles that require algebraic thinking to complete. The mechanics make it possible for students to make decisions about civilization and how history will unfold for them. They need to make decisions so that their civilization will survive and even flourish if possible.

HOW are you implementing the game? How are the learning goals of the game integrated into your activities and goals? ex: Before instruction, as a thought starter; As an in-class competition to stimulate peer learning; As extra credit or enrichment for a struggling student. The game is implemented as a part of the course in history. The game is integrated in that students are required to learn history but they should see it in a more personal way by building their own civilization. Peer learning is important because students need to learn the game and they can help one another and they need to compare their civilization with others.

As above, you need not create more than a page or a few minutes of video to make your point(s). Post your curriculum to a filesharing website (see our list if you don't already have a service you use), then post a link in your post in the forum. Check out how your peers responded. BE SURE TO MAKE THE DOCUMENT PUBLICLY VIEWABLE so that you classmates can see your work.

Guidance for Peer Feedback: Provide feedback to the two participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following: In your opinion, is this game suitable considering the subject matter and the identified students? Has the participant explained why this game will enable students to learn the desired subject/content? Do you think the game serves its purpose? Has the participant considered issues related to the implementation of the game? Examples: Would this game just be played once or would the students come back to it later? Would the students play the game with a limited population or everyone?

Percy Sledge, RIP

http://youtu.be/gOTRsq4Ogns

Mott The Hoople, Morgan Fisher

While on the subject of 70's albums, here's one I played on while I was with MTH. Every song is in a different style. Recorded in Nashville with Elvis' drummer and Dylan's bassist (or the other way round, can't remember). I think it's brilliant, even though it has a future Foreigner on it!  :wink: 

"Rainbow Rider" by Mike Harrison

http://boyzmakenoyze.blogspot.jp/2011/0 ... inbow.html

Some videos here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22mike ... 42&bih=790

Enjoy!

Morgan

Games: Unit 1

Welcome to Unit 1!
  • Case Study & Learning Games Landscape: Prof. Eric Klopfer and Scot Osterweil play and discuss MathBlaster and Zoombinis. They make some observations regarding the changing educational games landscape. 
  • Meaning and Interaction - Prof. Sasha Barab explores several aspects of gameplay, including social interactions and how games can evoke emotions.
  • Designer’s Perspective: Scot tells us about his experiences developing Zoombinis. 
  • Evolution of Games for Learning: Eric and Prof. Kurt Squire talk about how games can contribute to learning and how educational games have evolved. 
  • Analyzing Games: Eric introduces Dr. Konstantin Mitgutsch who talks about a framework for analysis that focuses on purpose and coherence. 
We will be reading James Paul Gee's "Learning and Games," a chapter in The Ecology of Games.  You may want to review the chapter prior to watching our conversations. 
Appearances by: Scot Osterweil, Sasha Barab, Kurt Squire, Konstantin Mitgutsch

http://youtu.be/b8AOpvAFcpI
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@be6bd690d0f74649a7ddf3a3d03629cf/handler/transcript/download
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@25622a94ac02454b942f9302e61304fe/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/kyTnVfNhVZs
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@10cd5dd9d793479b8e63b56ef9607d1b/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/kyTnVfNhVZs
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@67ccefbc02a740e58def02aecba67d7f/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/duU9xLrrgFI
Another important piece in building your foundation is to understand that, until the advent of the personal computer, there were many more games that were for playing with others than there were for playing alone. In fact, many researchers are investigating whether playfulness in humans is (at least in part) a means of learning how to understand one another. It is only very, very recently in the history of humankind that we have played games alone for hours. In this video, Sasha and Eric explore the deep social power that games have.
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@f8b1a983a36b45dbbb5f92de434af5f3/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/MkNw4U50jCc
We have found a few resources that allow you to explore early digital games including early games for learning including:
PlayRetroGames - This site was suggested by a course participant.
http://www.playretrogames.com
Game-Oldies.com: Scot and Eric played the version of MathBlaster and Zoombinis found on this website.
http://game-oldies.com
Old-Games.Com: This website has an educational games section, but not all games are compatible with all computer set-ups/operating systems. If there is a game you're really interested in on this site, you might want to see if you can play it online somewhere else.
http://www.old-games.com/games/educational
America, a real-time strategy game similar to Age of Empires or Settlers, is set during the 90 years following the United States' Civil War. Choose to direct Settlers, Indians, Mexicans, or Desperados, and manage units and resources to colonize the land under their rule. Each group offers distinctive abilities and appearances, with ten unique missions available for each of the competing factions across fifteen different game maps. As the game progresses, individual units develop different morale, life, and experience statistics according to their situations. Horses are a particularly vital resource and players may choose to breed, buy, or steal them to develop a strong cavalry. America's multiplayer options support up to eight players across a network.
http://www.old-games.com/download/9069/a-m-e-r-i
Take a few minutes to play an early game (or games!) and reflect on how it might align more closely with MathBlaster or Zoombinis regarding mechanics, instructions, etc. What are the characteristics of the game that make it resemble one more than the other?
You are welcome to share your reflections with your classmates in the forum.


https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@d79092e158e24321b70d4a1e5921136c/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/DG9NCol4KWI
Eric Klopfer talks with Prof. Kurt Squire of Games Learning Society (GLS) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison about influential educational technologies, what has made them valuable and how they can contribute to the learning process.
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@265a3cd9f6fa4b84904ff28f5e60fd2a/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/gfXejBle98c
Eric and Kurt continue their conversation about the history of educational games and how key technological developments have changed the focus and design of games.
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@1ca7578d418c451cb896da5708db4c83/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/adWpQuH6EVM
Use the list of games you created in Unit 0 to make a selective timeline of your own gameplay. As you make your timeline, note key events or technologies that may have influenced changes in your play. You can draw it on a piece of paper, make a presentation, or create a digital document, whichever is easiest for you. When you are done, review your timeline and highlight the educational games. Were your experiences playing these educational games more or less important than your experiences playing non-educational games? Did you play educational games in certain times of your life and maybe not in others?
You are welcome to share your timeline in the forum. If you choose to do so, be sure to save your document or take a picture of your work if you did it by hand. Then upload your file to your favorite filesharing site and select PUBLIC under your sharing settings. Post a link to your work and share any thoughts you have on the exercise.
Activity Break: Mapping Your Gameplay
https://voice.adobe.com/a/7jkZ8
Eric Klopfer introduces Dr. Konstantin Mitgutsch of Playful Solutions and his Serious Games Design Assessment Framework for analyzing serious games. This framework will provide some factors to consider as you reflect on some of the games we have discussed this week. It wil also be helpful as you begin to consider ideas for your final project. In addition, you are encouraged to use the Serious Games Desgin [sic] Assessment Framework for one of this unit's assignments: evaluating a game of your choice.
https://studio.edx.org/asset-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@asset+block@Purposeful_by_Design.pdf
https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015/xblock/block-v1:MITx+11.127x+1T2015+type@video+block@4a3c65b608594b74913a2cbac12c4be0/handler/transcript/download
http://youtu.be/9p8pxMJK4U8
ASSIGNMENT 1.1: EVALUATE A GAME
Suggested Due Date: 4/14/2015, 11:59 PM UTC
For this first assignment, pick a game and try to evaluate whether or not you think it’s a useful learning tool.
We know you are not yet an expert - we are asking you to use the points of view presented in the videos and the readings to launch your own thinking. There is no perfect way to evaluate a game, and your opinion is valid. There are several ways to approach thinking about this assignment. You might compare and contrast the game with a more traditional curriculum or activity. You might use the video and tool provided by Mitgutsch and Alvarado as a jumping off point for evaluating the game.
This is intended to be a brief assignment to get you thinking. You need not create more than a page or a few minutes of video to make your point(s). As with last unit, post it to a filesharing website (see our list if you don't already have a service you use), then post a link to your evaluation in the forums. Check out how your peers responded. BE SURE TO MAKE THE DOCUMENT PUBLICLY VIEWABLE so that you classmates can see your work.
Guidance for Peer Feedback
Provide feedback to the two participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following:
What is your definition of a "useful learning tool?" Does the participant you are providing feedback to seem to share the same definition? If the participant's understanding seems very different or identifies a characteristic of a useful learning tool that you find to be interesting or valuable, comment on that. How did the participant analyze/evaluate the chosen game? Did their evaluation yield a surprising insight or change your thinking regarding the game?
ASSIGNMENT 1.2: DRAFT CURRICULUM Suggested Due Date: 4/14/2015, 11:59 PM UTC For the second assignment in this unit, we’re asking you to draft a curriculum design - tell us how you would teach something with a game that already exists. Many of you may not have experience with designing curricula, but again this is a just a brief exercise to get you started thinking about how to teach with games. Here are some basic questions to consider (my game is Civilization IV): WHO are your students? Consider their age, grade level, etc. My students are working age adults the average age about 35 And this is college level. WHAT do you want them to learn? What are the content, skills, or ideas you want your students to come away with? ex: Underlying causes of the U.S. Civil War; Programming procedures; Pre-algebra understanding of variables I want them to learn history firsthand. The content is history but learning history skillfully through gameplay. The ideas I want them to come away with our depreciation of breaking difficult cultural decisions which may differ from the actual history, that is, counter history. WHERE are students playing the game? What is the context? Are they playing the game and discussing it in more than one context? ex: At home; In a 6th grade Computer Science classroom; On the bus on their phone I would see them playing it for about one hour in a four hour class session. There is a possibility though which the game allows and that is to play online against other players. WHY this game? What mechanics make it suited for this topic? ex: Role-playing as Abraham Lincoln, making decisions; Programming simple robots to complete game goals; Puzzles that require algebraic thinking to complete. The mechanics make it possible for students to make decisions about civilization and how history will unfold for them. They need to make decisions so that their civilization will survive and even flourish if possible. HOW are you implementing the game? How are the learning goals of the game integrated into your activities and goals? ex: Before instruction, as a thought starter; As an in-class competition to stimulate peer learning; As extra credit or enrichment for a struggling student. The game is implemented as a part of the course in history. The game is integrated in that students are required to learn history but they should see it in a more personal way by building their own civilization. Peer learning is important because students need to learn the game and they can help one another and they need to compare their civilization with others. As above, you need not create more than a page or a few minutes of video to make your point(s). Post your curriculum to a filesharing website (see our list if you don't already have a service you use), then post a link in your post in the forum. Check out how your peers responded. BE SURE TO MAKE THE DOCUMENT PUBLICLY VIEWABLE so that you classmates can see your work. Guidance for Peer Feedback: Provide feedback to the two participants whose posts appear below yours. If those participants have already received feedback, look for participants who have not received any. Follow the Peer Review Feedback guidelines and consider the following: In your opinion, is this game suitable considering the subject matter and the identified students? Has the participant explained why this game will enable students to learn the desired subject/content? Do you think the game serves its purpose?

Has the participant considered issues related to the implementation of the game? Examples: Would this game just be played once or would the students come back to it later? Would the students play the game with a limited population or everyone?

Introduction to Gameblox In this Unit, we continue our exploration of Gameblox, the digital game engine we are using in this course. Gameblox is a blocks-based programming language, similar to Scratch or MIT App Inventor. It is currently being developed by the MIT STEP Lab and participants in this course will have early access to Gameblox. If you haven't done so already, we encourage you to explore Gameblox and become familiar with the platform (If you're new to the course, consider commenting on your experience in the Assignment 0.2 forum. Need help? Ask in the Gameblox forums.). The goal is to explain the basic interface, point you at the built-in Gameblox tutorials, and encourage you to read through the examples given in the Help function. Gameblox HelpIf you are looking for support in Gameblox beyond the basic help functions and interface walkthrough, please visit the course discussion forums. There, you’ll find the Gameblox Help forums. There are threads for FAQs, release updates, tips for getting started, and bug reports. There is also a Gameblox show and tell forum to show off anything you've created in Gameblox. Note that you can always find Gameblox by selecting Gameblox from the menu at the top of the edX page. The next pages of this section will detail the Gameblox website and screen, and show you how to navigate them.

THE HOME PAGE The Gameblox home pageWhen you first visit the Gameblox site, you'll see something that looks like the picture to the right. The My Games section may be empty. Once you've created games of your own, they'll appear in My Games. Featured Projects will appear underneath, and if you keep scrolling down, you'll be able to see the Demos section, which are essentially small examples demonstrating a particular game mechanic or action you can create in Gameblox. GAMEBLOX PAGE NAVIGATION Top of Gameblox Home Menu BarGameblox's navigation menu is at the top of the page. To create a new game, click CREATE NEW GAME. If you wish to jump directly to the small project code samples section, click DEMOS. Clicking ACCOUNT will help you find all of the games you have created. Gameblox logo Clicking the GAMEBLOX logo at the top of any page in the Gameblox website will bring you back to the Gameblox home page, where you can see your games, Featured Projects, and Demo projects. (You may have to scroll down to find some sections.) For example, if you select ACCOUNT and only your own games are listed, you can return to the main page by clicking the GAMEBLOX logo. You will, once again, be able to see the Featured Projects and Demo projects.

MY GAMES From the My Games section of the Gameblox site, you can easily start editing or playing one of your games. Click the Edit button on one of your projects to start editing; click the Play button to jump to the play screen. THE PLAY SCREEN Click inside of the game screen to start Gameblox. The game may also require other clicks or keystrokes to get started, depending on your design. If you choose to Stop Game, you will need to click Reset Game to restart playing. The Edit button will take you to the Gameblox editor. If you choose to Create A Copy of the game, that will also take you to the Gameblox editor with a fresh copy of the project you were looking at. This is useful if you are going to experiment with new ideas and would like to keep a backup of an earlier version of your game. The Delete Project button will delete your project permanently! Be careful with this button!

THE GAMEBLOX EDITOR As soon as you select Create New Game, or Edit an existing project, you will find yourself in the Gameblox Editor. From here, you can design the physical layout of the game, create and edit game objects, and put together code blocks to control the behavior of the game. That's a lot of functionality, and so the Editor screen has multiple buttons, menus, and submenus to allow you to work on every aspect of your game. After a quick walkthrough of the Editor's layout, it should make more sense and be easier to navigate. EDITING MODES There are three major modes available in the Gameblox Editor: Design, Blocks, and Play. You can tell which mode you are in by colour: the orange button is the currently selected view. The picture of the bar above was taken in Design view. Click on the Design button to go into Design mode. Design mode allows you to create sprites (objects in your game), labels (for text and numbers on screen), and text inputs (for your players to enter data). Design mode also allows you to place objects on the game screen as they will appear at the start of game. You can also change the background appearance of your game in Design mode. Click on the Blocks button to go into Blocks mode, which is where you can find code blocks for your game can put them together to make your game behave the way you want. Click on the Play button to go to the Play mode and try out your game. To give your game a unique name, type in the new name in the box that says New Game. If you are working with a game copy, the original game's name will be in the box instead. Periodically use the Save button to save your game and its new name. Any changes you make to your game will not be preserved unless you click Save! If you want to get right to the introductory walkthroughs and demonstrations, click on either of theHelp buttons in the Gameblox Editor.

GOAL Create a new game on the Gameblox website. Once you are in the editor, use the Help button to bring up the tutorials and walkthroughs. Complete the Getting Started Tutorial. You may choose to look through the other tutorials but they are not required for this assignment. Click the Launch Gameblox button Click the CREATE NEW GAME button on the Gameblox website to start a new project. Click the Help button in the Gameblox editor to bring up a menu of tutorials. Click on the blue links and complete the five Getting Started Tutorials for Assignment 1. There is no peer assessment for this assignment. However, please report your successes, challenges, and results in the Discussion forums.





































Monday, April 13, 2015

National Security Breakdown on Islamism

Islamism

http://www.theblaze.com/blog/2015/04/13/listen-a-leading-national-security-advisor-and-islamic-law-expert-explains-how-and-why-america-is-losing-to-jihadists/

40 Presentation Tools

40

Islamic State Beheads Obama

Beheading

Cambridge Boston Mosque Reject Obama's Counter-Terrorism

Islamism

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Skateboard at 60 Crash

Skate

Friday, April 10, 2015

National Guard Violates the 1st Amendment

National Guard

KFC Customer Refused Hand-Wipe to Accomodate Islamic Halal Policy

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/ KFC Customer

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Coexist with Islam: Kaboom!

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque

Music appreciation

South Carolina Cop Murder, Shoots in Back

Dash cam car stop

South Carolina

Dancing with the Doggie Star

Dancing

D.C. Loses Power

D.C.

Games, Week 1, List of Games as Classified

Post a link to your list of games in the FORUMS (or just paste it in). Check out how your peers responded.

Childhood games
Simon Says
Jump rope
Marbles
Hop Scotch

Youth games
Baseball
Running bases
Basketball
Life
Strategy
Civil war
Football

Young adult/mature games 
Pong
Card games
Civilization
Rise of Rome


Total Pageviews

Popular Posts

FEEDJIT Live Traffic Feed/Site Meter

FEEDJIT Live Traffic Map

Where From?

site statistics

Search This Blog

Reading since summer 2006 (some of the classics are re-reads): including magazine subscriptions

  • Abbot, Edwin A., Flatland;
  • Accelerate: Technology Driving Business Performance;
  • ACM Queue: Architecting Tomorrow's Computing;
  • Adkins, Lesley and Roy A. Adkins, Handbook to Life in Ancient Rome;
  • Ali, Ayaan Hirsi, Nomad: From Islam to America: A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations;
  • Ali, Tariq, The Clash of Fundamentalisms: Crusades, Jihads, and Modernity;
  • Allawi, Ali A., The Crisis of Islamic Civilization;
  • Alperovitz, Gar, The Decision To Use the Atomic Bomb;
  • American School & University: Shaping Facilities & Business Decisions;
  • Angelich, Jane, What's a Mother (in-Law) to Do?: 5 Essential Steps to Building a Loving Relationship with Your Son's New Wife;
  • Arad, Yitzchak, In the Shadow of the Red Banner: Soviet Jews in the War Against Nazi Germany;
  • Aristotle, Athenian Constitution. Eudemian Ethics. Virtues and Vices. (Loeb Classical Library No. 285);
  • Aristotle, Metaphysics: Books X-XIV, Oeconomica, Magna Moralia (The Loeb classical library);
  • Armstrong, Karen, A History of God;
  • Arrian: Anabasis of Alexander, Books I-IV (Loeb Classical Library No. 236);
  • Atkinson, Rick, The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 (Liberation Trilogy);
  • Auletta, Ken, Googled: The End of the World As We Know It;
  • Austen, Jane, Pride and Prejudice;
  • Bacevich, Andrew, The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism;
  • Baker, James A. III, and Lee H. Hamilton, The Iraq Study Group Report: The Way Forward - A New Approach;
  • Barber, Benjamin R., Jihad vs. McWorld: Terrorism's Challenge to Democracy;
  • Barnett, Thomas P.M., Blueprint for Action: A Future Worth Creating;
  • Barnett, Thomas P.M., The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-First Century;
  • Barron, Robert, Catholicism: A Journey to the Heart of the Faith;
  • Baseline: Where Leadership Meets Technology;
  • Baur, Michael, Bauer, Stephen, eds., The Beatles and Philosophy;
  • Beard, Charles Austin, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States (Sony Reader);
  • Benjamin, Daniel & Steven Simon, The Age of Sacred Terror: Radical Islam's War Against America;
  • Bergen, Peter, The Osama bin Laden I Know: An Oral History of al Qaeda's Leader;
  • Berman, Paul, Terror and Liberalism;
  • Berman, Paul, The Flight of the Intellectuals: The Controversy Over Islamism and the Press;
  • Better Software: The Print Companion to StickyMinds.com;
  • Bleyer, Kevin, Me the People: One Man's Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America;
  • Boardman, Griffin, and Murray, The Oxford Illustrated History of the Roman World;
  • Bracken, Paul, The Second Nuclear Age: Strategy, Danger, and the New Power Politics;
  • Bradley, James, with Ron Powers, Flags of Our Fathers;
  • Bronte, Charlotte, Jane Eyre;
  • Bronte, Emily, Wuthering Heights;
  • Brown, Ashley, War in Peace Volume 10 1974-1984: The Marshall Cavendish Encyclopedia of Postwar Conflict;
  • Brown, Ashley, War in Peace Volume 8 The Marshall Cavendish Illustrated Encyclopedia of Postwar Conflict;
  • Brown, Nathan J., When Victory Is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics;
  • Bryce, Robert, Gusher of Lies: The Dangerous Delusions of "Energy Independence";
  • Bush, George W., Decision Points;
  • Bzdek, Vincent, The Kennedy Legacy: Jack, Bobby and Ted and a Family Dream Fulfilled;
  • Cahill, Thomas, Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter;
  • Campus Facility Maintenance: Promoting a Healthy & Productive Learning Environment;
  • Campus Technology: Empowering the World of Higher Education;
  • Certification: Tools and Techniques for the IT Professional;
  • Channel Advisor: Business Insights for Solution Providers;
  • Chariton, Callirhoe (Loeb Classical Library);
  • Chief Learning Officer: Solutions for Enterprise Productivity;
  • Christ, Karl, The Romans: An Introduction to Their History and Civilization;
  • Cicero, De Senectute;
  • Cicero, The Republic, The Laws;
  • Cicero, The Verrine Orations I: Against Caecilius. Against Verres, Part I; Part II, Book 1 (Loeb Classical Library);
  • Cicero, The Verrine Orations I: Against Caecilius. Against Verres, Part I; Part II, Book 2 (Loeb Classical Library);
  • CIO Decisions: Aligning I.T. and Business in the MidMarket Enterprise;
  • CIO Insight: Best Practices for IT Business Leaders;
  • CIO: Business Technology Leadership;
  • Clay, Lucius Du Bignon, Decision in Germany;
  • Cohen, William S., Dragon Fire;
  • Colacello, Bob, Ronnie and Nancy: Their Path to the White House, 1911 to 1980;
  • Coll, Steve, The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in the American Century;
  • Collins, Francis S., The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief ;
  • Colorni, Angelo, Israel for Beginners: A Field Guide for Encountering the Israelis in Their Natural Habitat;
  • Compliance & Technology;
  • Computerworld: The Voice of IT Management;
  • Connolly, Peter & Hazel Dodge, The Ancient City: Life in Classical Athens & Rome;
  • Conti, Greg, Googling Security: How Much Does Google Know About You?;
  • Converge: Strategy and Leadership for Technology in Education;
  • Cowan, Ross, Roman Legionary 58 BC - AD 69;
  • Cowell, F. R., Life in Ancient Rome;
  • Creel, Richard, Religion and Doubt: Toward a Faith of Your Own;
  • Cross, Robin, General Editor, The Encyclopedia of Warfare: The Changing Nature of Warfare from Prehistory to Modern-day Armed Conflicts;
  • CSO: The Resource for Security Executives:
  • Cummins, Joseph, History's Greatest Wars: The Epic Conflicts that Shaped the Modern World;
  • D'Amato, Raffaele, Imperial Roman Naval Forces 31 BC-AD 500;
  • Dallek, Robert, An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy 1917-1963;
  • Daly, Dennis, Sophocles' Ajax;
  • Dando-Collins, Stephen, Caesar's Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome;
  • Darwish, Nonie, Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror;
  • Davis Hanson, Victor, Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome;
  • Dawkins, Richard, The Blind Watchmaker;
  • Dawkins, Richard, The God Delusion;
  • Dawkins, Richard, The Selfish Gene;
  • de Blij, Harm, Why Geography Matters: Three Challenges Facing America, Climate Change, The Rise of China, and Global Terrorism;
  • Defense Systems: Information Technology and Net-Centric Warfare;
  • Defense Systems: Strategic Intelligence for Info Centric Operations;
  • Defense Tech Briefs: Engineering Solutions for Military and Aerospace;
  • Dennett, Daniel C., Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon;
  • Dennett, Daniel C., Consciousness Explained;
  • Dennett, Daniel C., Darwin's Dangerous Idea;
  • Devries, Kelly, et. al., Battles of the Ancient World 1285 BC - AD 451 : From Kadesh to Catalaunian Field;
  • Dickens, Charles, Great Expectations;
  • Digital Communities: Building Twenty-First Century Communities;
  • Doctorow, E.L., Homer & Langley;
  • Dodds, E. R., The Greeks and the Irrational;
  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor, The House of the Dead (Google Books, Sony e-Reader);
  • Dostoevsky, Fyodor, The Idiot;
  • Douglass, Elisha P., Rebels and Democrats: The Struggle for Equal Political Rights and Majority Role During the American Revolution;
  • Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan, The Hound of the Baskervilles & The Valley of Fear;
  • Dr. Dobb's Journal: The World of Software Development;
  • Drug Discovery News: Discovery/Development/Diagnostics/Delivery;
  • DT: Defense Technology International;
  • Dunbar, Richard, Alcatraz;
  • Education Channel Partner: News, Trends, and Analysis for K-20 Sales Professionals;
  • Edwards, Aton, Preparedness Now!;
  • EGM: Electronic Gaming Monthly, the No. 1 Videogame Magazine;
  • Ehrman, Bart D., Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scriptures and the Faiths We Never Knew;
  • Ehrman, Bart D., Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why;
  • Electronic Engineering Times: The Industry Newsweekly for the Creators of Technology;
  • Ellis, Joseph J., American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson;
  • Ellis, Joseph J., His Excellency: George Washington;
  • Emergency Management: Strategy & Leadership in Critical Times;
  • Emerson, Steven, American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Among Us;
  • Erlewine, Robert, Monotheism and Tolerance: Recovering a Religion of Reason (Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion);
  • ESD: Embedded Systems Design;
  • Everitt, Anthony, Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor;
  • Everitt, Anthony, Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician;
  • eWeek: The Enterprise Newsweekly;
  • Federal Computer Week: Powering the Business of Government;
  • Ferguson, Niall, Civilization: The West and the Rest;
  • Ferguson, Niall, Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power;
  • Ferguson, Niall, The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World, 1700-2000;
  • Ferguson, Niall, The War of the World: Twentieth-Century Conflict and the Decline of the West;
  • Feuerbach, Ludwig, The Essence of Christianity (Sony eReader);
  • Fields, Nic, The Roman Army of the Principate 27 BC-AD 117;
  • Fields, Nic, The Roman Army of the Punic Wars 264-146 BC;
  • Fields, Nic, The Roman Army: the Civil Wars 88-31 BC;
  • Finkel, Caroline, Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire;
  • Fisk, Robert, The Great War For Civilization: The Conquest of the Middle East;
  • Forstchen, William R., One Second After;
  • Fox, Robin Lane, The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian;
  • Frazer, James George, The Golden Bough (Volume 3): A Study in Magic and Religion (Sony eReader);
  • Freeh, Louis J., My FBI: Bringing Down the Mafia, Investigating Bill Clinton, and Fighting the War on Terror;
  • Freeman, Charles, The Greek Achievement: The Foundations of the Western World;
  • Friedman, Thomas L. The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century Further Updated and Expanded/Release 3.0;
  • Friedman, Thomas L., The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization;
  • Frontinus: Stratagems. Aqueducts of Rome. (Loeb Classical Library No. 174);
  • Fuller Focus: Fuller Theological Seminary;
  • Fuller, Graham E., A World Without Islam;
  • Gaubatz, P. David and Paul Sperry, Muslim Mafia: Inside the Secret Underworld That's Conspiring to Islamize America;
  • Ghattas, Kim, The Secretary: A Journey with Hillary Clinton from Beirut to the Heart of American Power;
  • Gibson, William, Neuromancer;
  • Gilmour, Michael J., Gods and Guitars: Seeking the Sacred in Post-1960s Popular Music;
  • Global Services: Strategies for Sourcing People, Processes, and Technologies;
  • Glucklich, Ariel, Dying for Heaven: Holy Pleasure and Suicide Bombers-Why the Best Qualities of Religion Are Also It's Most Dangerous;
  • Goldberg, Jonah, Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning;
  • Goldin, Shmuel, Unlocking the Torah Text Vayikra (Leviticus);
  • Goldsworthy, Adrian, Caesar: Life of a Colossus;
  • Goldsworthy, Adrian, How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower;
  • Goodman, Lenn E., Creation and Evolution;
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln;
  • Gopp, Amy, et.al., Split Ticket: Independent Faith in a Time of Partisan Politics (WTF: Where's the Faith?);
  • Gordon, Michael R., and Bernard E. Trainor, Cobra II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq;
  • Government Health IT: The Magazine of Public/private Health Care Convergence;
  • Government Technology's Emergency Management: Strategy & Leadership in Critical Times;
  • Government Technology: Solutions for State and Local Government in the Information Age;
  • Grant , Michael, The Climax of Rome: The Final Achievements of the Ancient World, AD 161 - 337;
  • Grant, Michael, The Classical Greeks;
  • Grumberg, Orna, and Helmut Veith, 25 Years of Model Checking: History, Achievements, Perspectives;
  • Halberstam, David, War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton, and the Generals;
  • Hammer, Reuven, Entering Torah Prefaces to the Weekly Torah Portion;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, An Autumn of War: What America Learned from September 11 and the War on Terrorism;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, Between War and Peace: Lessons from Afghanistan to Iraq;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, How The Obama Administration Threatens Our National Security (Encounter Broadsides);
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, The End of Sparta: A Novel;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, The Soul of Battle: From Ancient Times to the Present Day, How Three Great Liberators Vanquished Tyranny;
  • Hanson, Victor Davis, Wars of the Ancient Greeks;
  • Harnack, Adolf Von, History of Dogma, Volume 3 (Sony Reader);
  • Harris, Alex, Reputation At Risk: Reputation Report;
  • Harris, Sam, Letter to a Christian Nation;
  • Harris, Sam, The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason;
  • Hayek, F. A., The Road to Serfdom;
  • Heilbroner, Robert L., and Lester Thurow, Economics Explained: Everything You Need to Know About How the Economy Works and Where It's Going;
  • Hempel, Sandra, The Strange Case of The Broad Street Pump: John Snow and the Mystery of Cholera;
  • Hinnells, John R., A Handbook of Ancient Religions;
  • Hitchens, Christopher, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything;
  • Hogg, Ian V., The Encyclopedia of Weaponry: The Development of Weaponry from Prehistory to 21st Century Warfare;
  • Hugo, Victor, The Hunchback of Notre Dame;
  • Humphrey, Caroline & Vitebsky, Piers, Sacred Architecture;
  • Huntington, Samuel P., The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order;
  • Info World: Information Technology News, Computer Networking & Security;
  • Information Week: Business Innovation Powered by Technology:
  • Infostor: The Leading Source for Enterprise Storage Professionals;
  • Infrastructure Insite: Bringing IT Together;
  • Insurance Technology: Business Innovation Powered by Technology;
  • Integrated Solutions: For Enterprise Content Management;
  • Intel Premier IT: Sharing Best Practices with the Information Technology Community;
  • Irwin, Robert, Dangerous Knowledge: Orientalism and Its Discontents;
  • Jeffrey, Grant R., The Global-Warming Deception: How a Secret Elite Plans to Bankrupt America and Steal Your Freedom;
  • Jewkes, Yvonne, and Majid Yar, Handbook of Internet Crime;
  • Johnson, Chalmers, Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire;
  • Journal, The: Transforming Education Through Technology;
  • Judd, Denis, The Lion and the Tiger: The Rise and Fall of the British Raj, 1600-1947;
  • Kagan, Donald, The Peloponnesian War;
  • Kansas, Dave, The Wall Street Journal Guide to the End of Wall Street as We Know It: What You Need to Know About the Greatest Financial Crisis of Our Time--and How to Survive It;
  • Karsh, Efraim, Islamic Imperialism: A History;
  • Kasser, Rodolphe, The Gospel of Judas;
  • Katz, Solomon, The Decline of Rome and the Rise of Medieval Europe: (The Development of Western Civilization);
  • Keegan, John, Intelligence in War: The Value--and Limitations--of What the Military Can Learn About the Enemy;
  • Kenis, Leo, et. al., The Transformation of the Christian Churches in Western Europe 1945-2000 (Kadoc Studies on Religion, Culture and Society 6);
  • Kepel, Gilles, Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam;
  • Kiplinger's: Personal Finance;
  • Klein, Naomi, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism;
  • KM World: Content, Document, and Knowledge Management;
  • Koestler, Arthur, Darkness at Noon: A Novel;
  • Kostova, Elizabeth, The Historian;
  • Kuttner, Robert, The Squandering of America: How the Failure of Our Politics Undermines Our Prosperity;
  • Lake, Kirsopp, The Text of the New Testament, Sony Reader;
  • Laur, Timothy M., Encyclopedia of Modern US Military Weapons ;
  • Leffler, Melvyn P., and Jeffrey W. Legro, To Lead the World: American Strategy After the Bush Doctrine;
  • Lendon, J. E., Soldiers and Ghosts: A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity;
  • Lenin, V. I., Imperialism the Highest Stage of Capitalism;
  • Lennon, John J., There is Absolutely No Reason to Pay Too Much for College!;
  • Lewis, Bernard, The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror;
  • Lewis, Bernard, What Went Wrong?: The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East;
  • Lifton, Robert J., Greg Mitchell, Hiroshima in America;
  • Limberis, Vasiliki M., Architects of Piety: The Cappadocian Fathers and the Cult of the Martyrs;
  • Lipsett, B. Diane, Desiring Conversion: Hermas, Thecla, Aseneth;
  • Livingston, Jessica, Founders At Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days;
  • Livy, Rome and the Mediterranean: Books XXXI-XLV of the History of Rome from its Foundation (Penguin Classics);
  • Louis J., Freeh, My FBI: Bringing Down the Mafia, Investigating Bill Clinton, and Fighting the War on Terror;
  • Mackay, Christopher S., Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History;
  • Majno, Guido, The Healing Hand: Man and Wound in the Ancient World;
  • Marcus, Greil,Invisible Republic: Bob Dylan's Basement Tapes;
  • Marshall-Cornwall, James, Napoleon as Military Commander;
  • Maughm, W. Somerset, Of Human Bondage;
  • McCluskey, Neal P., Feds in the Classroom: How Big Government Corrupts, Cripples, and Compromises American Education;
  • McCullough, David, 1776;
  • McCullough, David, John Adams;
  • McCullough, David, Mornings on Horseback: The Story of an Extraordinary Family, a Vanished Way of Life and the Unique Child Who Became Theodore Roosevelt;
  • McLynn, Frank, Marcus Aurelius: A Life;
  • McManus, John, Deadly Brotherhood, The: The American Combat Soldier in World War II ;
  • McMaster, H. R., Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam;
  • McNamara, Patrick, Science and the World's Religions Volume 1: Origins and Destinies (Brain, Behavior, and Evolution);
  • McNamara, Patrick, Science and the World's Religions Volume 2: Persons and Groups (Brain, Behavior, and Evolution);
  • McNamara, Patrick, Science and the World's Religions Volume 3: Religions and Controversies (Brain, Behavior, and Evolution);
  • Meacham, Jon, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House;
  • Mearsheimer, John J., and Stephen M. Walt, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy;
  • Meier, Christian, Caesar: A Biography;
  • Menzies, Gaven, 1421: The Year China Discovered America;
  • Metaxas, Eric, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy;
  • Michael, Katina and M.G. Michael, Innovative Automatic Identification and Location-Based Services: From Barcodes to Chip Implants;
  • Migliore, Daniel L., Faith Seeking Understanding: An Introduction to Christian Theology;
  • Military & Aerospace Electronics: The Magazine of Transformation in Electronic and Optical Technology;
  • Millard, Candice, Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey: The River of Doubt;
  • Mommsen, Theodor, The History of the Roman Republic, Sony Reader;
  • Muller, F. Max, Chips From A German Workshop: Volume III: Essays On Language And Literature;
  • Murray, Janet, H., Hamlet On the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace;
  • Murray, Williamson, War in the Air 1914-45;
  • Müller, F. Max, Chips From A German Workshop;
  • Nader, Ralph, Crashing the Party: Taking on the Corporate Government in an Age of Surrender;
  • Nagl, John A., Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam;
  • Napoleoni, Loretta, Terrorism and the Economy: How the War on Terror is Bankrupting the World;
  • Nature: The International Weekly Journal of Science;
  • Negus, Christopher, Fedora 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux;
  • Network Computing: For IT by IT:
  • Network World: The Leader in Network Knowledge;
  • Network-centric Security: Where Physical Security & IT Worlds Converge;
  • Newman, Paul B., Travel and Trade in the Middle Ages;
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, The Nietzsche-Wagner Correspondence;
  • Nixon, Ed, The Nixons: A Family Portrait;
  • O'Brien, Johnny, Day of the Assassins: A Jack Christie Novel;
  • O'Donnell, James J., Augustine: A New Biography;
  • OH & S: Occupational Health & Safety
  • Okakura, Kakuzo, The Book of Tea;
  • Optimize: Business Strategy & Execution for CIOs;
  • Ostler, Nicholas, Ad Infinitum: A Biography of Latin;
  • Parry, Jay A., The Real George Washington (American Classic Series);
  • Paton, W.R., The Greek Anthology, Volume V, Loeb Classical Library, No. 86;
  • Pausanius, Guide to Greece 1: Central Greece;
  • Perrett, Bryan, Cassell Military Classics: Iron Fist: Classic Armoured Warfare;
  • Perrottet, Tony, The Naked Olympics: The True Story of the Olympic Games;
  • Peters, Ralph, New Glory: Expanding America's Global Supremacy;
  • Phillips, Kevin, American Dynasty: Aristocracy, Fortune, and the Politics of Deceit in the House of Bush;
  • Pick, Bernhard; Paralipomena; Remains of Gospels and Sayings of Christ (Sony Reader);
  • Pimlott, John, The Elite: The Special Forces of the World Volume 1;
  • Pitre, Brant, Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist: Unlocking the Secrets of the Last Supper;
  • Plutarch's Lives, X: Agis and Cleomenes. Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus. Philopoemen and Flamininus (Loeb Classical Library®);
  • Podhoretz, Norman, World War IV: The Long Struggle Against Islamofascism;
  • Posner, Gerald, Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK;
  • Potter, Wendell, Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR Is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans;
  • Pouesi, Daniel, Akua;
  • Premier IT Magazine: Sharing Best Practices with the Information Technology Community;
  • Price, Monroe E. & Daniel Dayan, eds., Owning the Olympics: Narratives of the New China;
  • Profit: The Executive's Guide to Oracle Applications;
  • Public CIO: Technology Leadership in the Public Sector;
  • Putnam, Robert D., Bowling Alone : The Collapse and Revival of American Community;
  • Quintus of Smyrna, The Fall of Troy;
  • Rawles, James Wesley, Patriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse;
  • Red Herring: The Business of Technology;
  • Redmond Channel Partner: Driving Success in the Microsoft Partner Community;
  • Redmond Magazine: The Independent Voice of the Microsoft IT Community;
  • Renan, Ernest, The life of Jesus (Sony eReader);
  • Richler, Mordecai (editor), Writers on World War II: An Anthology;
  • Roberts, Ian, The Energy Glut: Climate Change and the Politics of Fatness in an Overheating World;
  • Rocca, Samuel, The Army of Herod the Great;
  • Rodgers, Nigel, A Military History of Ancient Greece: An Authoritative Account of the Politics, Armies and Wars During the Golden Age of Ancient Greece, shown in over 200 color photographs, diagrams, maps and plans;
  • Rodoreda, Merce, Death in Spring: A Novel;
  • Romerstein, Herbert and Breindel, Eric,The Venona Secrets, Exposing Soviet Espionage and America's Traitors;
  • Ross, Dennis, Statecraft: And How to Restore America's Standing in the World;
  • Roth, Jonathan P., Roman Warfare (Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization);
  • SC Magazine: For IT Security Professionals;
  • Scahill, Jeremy, Blackwater: The Rise of the World's Most Powerful Mercenary Army [Revised and Updated];
  • Schama, Simon, A History of Britain, At the Edge of the World 3500 B.C. - 1603 A.D.;
  • Scheuer, Michael, Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War On Terror;
  • Scheuer, Michael, Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq;
  • Scheuer, Michael, Osama Bin Laden;
  • Scheuer, Michael, Through Our Enemies Eyes: Osama Bin Laden, Radical Islam, and the Future of America;
  • Scholastic Instructor
  • Scholastic Parent & Child: The Joy of Family Living and Learning;
  • Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will And Idea (Sony eReader);
  • Schug-Wille, Art of the Byzantine World;
  • Schulze, Hagen, Germany: A New History;
  • Schweizer, Peter, Architects of Ruin: How Big Government Liberals Wrecked the Global Economy---and How They Will Do It Again If No One Stops Them;
  • Scott, Sir Walter, Ivanhoe;
  • Seagren, Eric, Secure Your Network for Free: Using Nmap, Wireshark, Snort, Nessus, and MRTG;
  • Security Technology & Design: The Security Executive's Resource for Systems Integration and Convergence;
  • Seibel, Peter, Coders at Work;
  • Sekunda N., & S. Northwood, Early Roman Armies;
  • Seneca: Naturales Quaestiones, Books II (Loeb Classical Library No. 450);
  • Sewall, Sarah, The U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual;
  • Sheppard, Ruth, Alexander the Great at War: His Army - His Battles - His Enemies;
  • Shinder, Jason, ed., The Poem That Changed America: "Howl" Fifty Years Later;
  • Sidebottom, Harry, Ancient Warfare: A Very Short Introduction;
  • Sides, Hampton, Blood and Thunder: The Epic Story of Kit Carson and the Conquest of the American West;
  • Simkins, Michael, The Roman Army from Caesar to Trajan;
  • Sinchak, Steve, Hacking Windows Vista;
  • Smith, RJ, The One: The Life and Music of James Brown;
  • Software Development Times: The Industry Newspaper for Software Development Managers;
  • Software Test Performance;
  • Solomon, Norman, War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death;
  • Song, Lolan, Innovation Together: Microsoft Research Asia Academic Research Collaboration;
  • Sophocles, The Three Theban Plays, tr. Robert Fagles;
  • Sound & Vision: The Consumer Electronics Authority;
  • Southern, Pat, The Roman Army: A Social and Institutional History;
  • Sri, Edward, A Biblical Walk Through the Mass: Understanding What We Say and Do In The Liturgy;
  • Sri, Edward, Men, Women and the Mystery of Love: Practical Insights from John Paul II's Love and Responsibility;
  • Stair, John Bettridge, Old Samoa; Or, Flotsam and Jetsam From the Pacific Ocean;
  • Starr, Chester G., The Roman Empire, 27 B.C.-A.D. 476: A Study in Survival;
  • Starr, John Bryan, Understanding China: A Guide to China's Economy, History, and Political Culture;
  • Stauffer, John, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln;
  • Steyn, Mark, America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It;
  • Strassler, Robert B., The Landmark Herodotus: The Histories;
  • Strassler, Robert B., The Landmark Thucydides: A Comprehensive Guide to the Peloponnesian War;
  • Strassler, Robert B., The Landmark Xenophon's Hellenika;
  • Strategy + Business;
  • Streete, Gail, Redeemed Bodies: Women Martyrs in Early Christianity;
  • Sullivan, James, The Hardest Working Man: How James Brown Saved the Soul of America;
  • Sumner, Graham, Roman Military Clothing (1) 100 BC-AD 200;
  • Sumner, Graham, Roman Military Clothing (2) AD 200-400;
  • Suskind, Ron, The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside America's Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11:
  • Swanston, Malcolm, Mapping History Battles and Campaigns;
  • Swiderski, Richard M., Quicksilver: A History of the Use, Lore, and Effects of Mercury;
  • Swiderski, Richard M., Quicksilver: A History of the Use, Lore, and Effects of Mercury;
  • Swift, Jonathan, Gulliver's Travels;
  • Syme, Ronald, The Roman Revolution;
  • Talley, Colin L., A History of Multiple Sclerosis;
  • Tawil, Camille, Brothers In Arms: The Story of al-Qa'ida and the Arab Jihadists;
  • Tech Briefs: Engineering Solutions for Design & Manufacturing;
  • Tech Net: The Microsoft Journal for IT Professionals;
  • Tech Partner: Gain a Competitive Edge Through Solutions Providers;
  • Technology & Learning: Ideas and Tools for Ed Tech Leaders;
  • Tenet, George, At the Center of the Storm: The CIA During America's Time of Crisis;
  • Thackeray, W. M., Vanity Fair;
  • Thompson, Derrick & William Martin, Have Guitars ... Will Travel: A Journey Through the Beat Music Scene in Northampton 1957-66;
  • Tolstoy, Leo, Anna Karenina;
  • Trento, Joseph J., The Secret History of the CIA;
  • Twain, Mark, The Gilded Age: a Tale of Today;
  • Ungar, Craig, House of Bush House of Saud;
  • Unterberger, Richie, The Unreleased Beatles Music & Film;
  • VAR Business: Strategic Insight for Technology Integrators:
  • Virgil, The Aeneid
  • Virtualization Review: Powering the New IT Generation;
  • Visual Studio: Enterprise Solutions for .Net Development;
  • VON Magazine: Voice, Video & Vision;
  • Wall Street Technology: Business Innovation Powered by Technology;
  • Wallace, Robert, Spycraft: The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs, from Communism to al-Qaeda;
  • Wang, Wallace, Steal This Computer Book 4.0: What They Won’t Tell You About the Internet;
  • Ward-Perkins, The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilization;
  • Warren, Robert Penn, All the King's Men;
  • Wasik, John F., Cul-de-Sac Syndrome: Turning Around the Unsustainable American Dream;
  • Weber, Karl, Editor, Lincoln: A President for the Ages;
  • Website Magazine: The Magazine for Website Success;
  • Weiner, Tim, Enemies: A History of the FBI;
  • Weiner, Tim, Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA;
  • West, Bing, The Strongest Tribe: War, Politics, and the Endgame in Iraq;
  • Wharton, Edith, The Age of Innocence;
  • Wilcox, Peter, Rome's Enemies (1) Germanics and Dacians;
  • Wise, Terence, Armies of the Carthaginian Wars 265 - 146 BC;
  • Wissner-Gross, What Colleges Don't Tell You (And Other Parents Don't Want You To Know) 272 Secrets For Getting Your Kid Into the Top Schools;
  • Wissner-Gross, What High Schools Don't Tell You;
  • Wolf, Naomi, Give Me Liberty: A Handbook for American Revolutionaries;
  • Wolf, Naomi, The End of America: Letter of Warning to a Young Patriot;
  • Woodward, Bob, Plan of Attack;
  • Woodward, Bob, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House;
  • Wright, Lawrence, The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11;
  • Wright-Porto, Heather, Beginning Google Blogger;
  • Xenophon, The Anabasis of Cyrus;
  • Yergin, Daniel, The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, & Power;

Computing Reviews

Handy Tools, Links, etc.

This Website is a Belligerent Act

Share |

SmileyCentral.com

Radical Christian

My secure contact form

Choice Reviews Online

techLEARNING.com

CIO and Strategy & Business magazines

Mil-aero info

Defense Systems

Nature: International Weekly Journal of Science

CIO

Choice Reviews Online

SD Times: Software Development News

KMworld

SC Magazine for Security Professionals

Bloggers' Rights at EFF

The Scientist


Missile Defense
33 Minutes

Government Technology: Solutions for State and Local Government in the Information Age

Insurance & Technology

What's Running is a great tool so that you can see what is running on your desktop.

Process Lasso lets you view your processor and its responsiveness.

Online Armor lets you view your firewall status.

CCleaner - Freeware Windows Optimization

Avast is a terrific scrubber of all virus miscreants.

ClamWin is an effective deterrent for the little nasty things that can crop into your machine.

Ad-Aware is a sound anti-virus tool.

Blog Directory & Search engine

For all your electronic appliance needs research products on this terrific site.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

Recent Comments

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of this blogger. Comments are screened for relevance, substance, and tone, and in some cases edited, before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome, but not hostile, libelous, or otherwise objectionable statements. Original writing only, please. Thank you. Subscribe with Bloglines

Blog Smith Headline Animator

Library Thing: Chicks Dig Readers

Blog Archive

National Debt Clock

"Congress: I'm Watching"

A tax on toilet paper; I kid you not. According to the sponsor, "the Water Protection and Reinvestment Act will be financed broadly by small fees on such things as . . . products disposed of in waste water." Congress wants to tax what you do in the privacy of your bathroom.

The Religion of Peace

Musical support powered by:

Loading...

Portrait of Thinking Hero

Portrait of Thinking Hero
1844-1900

Check out:

Check out:
Chicks dig readers.

Video Bar

Loading...
@ Blog Smith. Powered by Blogger.